Dec 21, 2010

ASI Study: Promotional Products Beat Prime-Time TV

Ad specialties are less expensive per impression than most other media

TREVOSE, PA – November 8, 2010– The Advertising Specialty Institute today released a landmark study that proves advertising specialties beat out prime-time TV, radio and print advertising as the most cost-effective advertising medium available.

The most significant findings of the 2010 Global Advertising Specialties Impressions Study show advertising specialties are less expensive per impression than most other media* and are very affordable and effective when compared to other forms of media.

To complete its research, ASI conducted a total of 3,332 online and in-person surveys, including interviews with businesspeople in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, London, Sydney, Toronto and Montreal metro areas.

The 2.0 study, a follow-up to the definitive 2008 survey, includes new demographic information on politics, ethnicity, gender and age, since knowing the likely recipient of products is paramount for an advertiser. This year, the comprehensive report also adds global markets and includes more products, such as automotive accessories and food.

The study was released at the fourth annual ASI Power Summit in Aventura, Florida. Among key findings, results show:

• Cost per Impression. In the U.S., the cost per impression of a promotional product stayed virtually the same from 2008 to 2010, at .005 cents.

• Product Usage. Bags have the highest number of impressions in a month, over 1,000, and over one-third (36%) of those with incomes under $50,000 own bags.

• Gender Preferences. Males are more likely than females to own shirts and caps, while females are more likely to have bags, writing instruments, calendars and health and safety products.

• Ethnic Preferences. African Americans have more promotional products on average (11.3) than any other group.

• Positive Reinforcement. 75% of independent voters prefer consumer-branded products; nearly 1.5 times more than Democrats or Republicans.

• Identifying the Advertiser. 83 % in the U.S. say they can identify the advertiser on a promotional item they own.

• Influencing User Opinions. 41% of U.S. respondents say their opinion of the advertiser is more favorable after receiving a promotional product.

• Global Reach. Nearly two-thirds (63%) of respondents from Great Britain have received and kept a pen in the last 12 months. In the U.S., writing instruments are used the most often, an average of 18.2 times per month.

• Popular Products. The most commonly owned promotional products among U.S. respondents are writing instruments (46%), followed by shirts (38%) and calendars (24%).

• Promo Product Capital. Los Angeles has the highest average number of items owned, at 12.7.

ASI’s research studies are the most influential in the industry’s history, continuously cited throughout the B-to-B industry and across the advertising and marketing spectrum.

“Our 2010 study once again proves the undeniable power of promotional products,” said Timothy M. Andrews, president and chief executive officer of ASI. “Distributors and suppliers should use these results to educate their customers, prospects and end-buyers about ways ad specialties can increase sales and brand exposure. Even smaller companies can deliver the kind of high-impact punch enjoyed by multi-million-dollar companies.

“It’s important to note that the pass-along rate has actually increased 11 points from just two years ago – which speaks directly to the global recycling trend. Not only do ad specialties make impressions on everyone who sees them, but messaging is reinforced every time the item is used. No other form of media can allow the advertiser to so closely tie a benefit to the recipient.”

At $0.005, the average cost-per-impression (CPI) of an advertising specialty item is less than nearly any other media. According to data obtained by ASI* the CPI for a national magazine ad is $0.045; for a newspaper ad, $0.029; for a prime-time TV ad, $0.018; for a cable prime-time TV ad, $0.005; for a syndicated daytime TV ad, $0.005; and for a spot radio ad, $0.058.

These statistics show marketers get a more favorable return on investment from advertising specialties than almost any other popular media, with a very low cost per impression, high recall among those who receive ad specialty items, and increased intent among recipients to make purchases from the advertiser.

There´s also been a study on the major goals of business gifts, examined by the British University of Lincoln.

Their results show that the target of promotional gifts are for the brithis market:

Advertising / promotion of the company (26%), building goodwill (16%) and create loyalty (13%) were the main targets. But also as to thank a relationship (11%), retain current customers (9%) and for new clients (7%) scored high.

The recipients of gifts are in most cases; existing customers (34%), potential customers (19%) and staff (19%).

For more information, contact Larry Basinait, executive director of research services for ASI, at (800) 546-1416 and



  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. Is there any further reading you would recommend on this?

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